(this post was reblogged from beatonna)

pianosplus:

Robin Williams narrates Peter and the Wolf with a youth symphony on Dec. 12, 1993. Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

(this post was reblogged from classicalliterature)

lunar-lavender:

jaxtracrat:

THE LION KING Broadway Cast Takes Over NYC Subway and Sings ‘Circle Of Life’

Gosh even just the video of this made me tear up. How are all those people just sitting around and looking confused? I’d be on the ceiling with excitement.

(this post was reblogged from espeon)
(this post was reblogged from keruth)
Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair.

Melissa Harris-Perry

This is also referred to as The Just World Fallacy. If the world is “good and just,” then bad things must only happen to people who “deserved it or caused it.” Except the world is not good and just. And despite individual people choosing to be good and/or just, structures, institutions and systems remain corrupt overall. Primarily through the media is the idea that bad only happens to those who deserve suffering conveyed. Add this to the manifestations of oppression based on gender, race, class, nationality, citizenship, sexual orientation, size, etc. and things like rape culture for example, thrive. And even ideologies that appear “harmless” to some people like prosperity gospel, positivity culture, the law of attraction and American exceptionalism are based on ignoring systemic inequality and focusing on exceptional cases. They stand firm in this particular fallacy.

See, it requires quite a bit from a person to be willing to challenge the world as is. It is psychologically, emotionally and intellectually easier to victim blame. It also helps people protect their psyches from the thought that something bad could happen to them or worse, that they are the causes of those bad things happening to others.

Still…it’s unacceptable. Victim blaming = unacceptable. The right thing to do is listen and support victims/survivors of anything and the oppressed of any form of oppression and work to deconstruct the structures, institutions and systems that make it possible. On an individual level, it requires accountability.

(via gradientlair)

(this post was reblogged from al1194)

gerbera-daisies:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Nekozushi

“Happiness and the absurd are two sons of the same earth,” said Albert Camus. “They are inseparable.” Indeed, absurdity does have a way of instilling happiness in us. Take, for example, Nekozushi, the brainchild of Japanese company Tange & Nakimushi Peanuts (a name that’s equally absurd).

Nekozushi, or Cat Sushi, is exactly what you think it is: a series of felines placed on top of a bed of rice and playfully adorned with props to make them look like different types of sushi. Hooray for absurdity?

Last year a Nekozushi shop opened where you can get your very own Nekozushi postcard or calendar. They even have a buying guide in English. And, no, nothing from the shop is edible.

EAT ALL THE CATS

(this post was reblogged from unsoothed)

balanc3andcomposure:

things that make you feel powerful

  • matching lace underwear
  • heels (and the clicking noise they make when you walk and you know you lookin hot)
  • red lipstick
  • perfect coal black eyeliner
  • curled hair
  • freshly done nails
  • cute new clothes

Reblogging as a note to myself for later… because I can’t understand it at all, but I have been trying to. I’m not even sure what demographic this resonates with… I should spend some time finding out.

(this post was reblogged from unsoothed)