(this post was reblogged from keruth)
Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair.

Melissa Harris-Perry

This is also referred to as The Just World Fallacy. If the world is “good and just,” then bad things must only happen to people who “deserved it or caused it.” Except the world is not good and just. And despite individual people choosing to be good and/or just, structures, institutions and systems remain corrupt overall. Primarily through the media is the idea that bad only happens to those who deserve suffering conveyed. Add this to the manifestations of oppression based on gender, race, class, nationality, citizenship, sexual orientation, size, etc. and things like rape culture for example, thrive. And even ideologies that appear “harmless” to some people like prosperity gospel, positivity culture, the law of attraction and American exceptionalism are based on ignoring systemic inequality and focusing on exceptional cases. They stand firm in this particular fallacy.

See, it requires quite a bit from a person to be willing to challenge the world as is. It is psychologically, emotionally and intellectually easier to victim blame. It also helps people protect their psyches from the thought that something bad could happen to them or worse, that they are the causes of those bad things happening to others.

Still…it’s unacceptable. Victim blaming = unacceptable. The right thing to do is listen and support victims/survivors of anything and the oppressed of any form of oppression and work to deconstruct the structures, institutions and systems that make it possible. On an individual level, it requires accountability.

(via gradientlair)

(this post was reblogged from al1194)

gerbera-daisies:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Nekozushi

“Happiness and the absurd are two sons of the same earth,” said Albert Camus. “They are inseparable.” Indeed, absurdity does have a way of instilling happiness in us. Take, for example, Nekozushi, the brainchild of Japanese company Tange & Nakimushi Peanuts (a name that’s equally absurd).

Nekozushi, or Cat Sushi, is exactly what you think it is: a series of felines placed on top of a bed of rice and playfully adorned with props to make them look like different types of sushi. Hooray for absurdity?

Last year a Nekozushi shop opened where you can get your very own Nekozushi postcard or calendar. They even have a buying guide in English. And, no, nothing from the shop is edible.

EAT ALL THE CATS

(this post was reblogged from unsoothed)

balanc3andcomposure:

things that make you feel powerful

  • matching lace underwear
  • heels (and the clicking noise they make when you walk and you know you lookin hot)
  • red lipstick
  • perfect coal black eyeliner
  • curled hair
  • freshly done nails
  • cute new clothes

Reblogging as a note to myself for later… because I can’t understand it at all, but I have been trying to. I’m not even sure what demographic this resonates with… I should spend some time finding out.

(this post was reblogged from unsoothed)

stream-space:

lunulata:

No really. Watch this.

Ancient Chinese instrument, the sheng, which originated back in 1,100 BC, and it can perfectly replicate the music in Mario.

It even makes the coin noises.

Fuckin excellent

(this post was reblogged from flipyeahbandbuffalo)

Why teach music?

Music is a science:
It is exact, specific, and it demands exact acoustics. A conductor’s full score is a chart, a graph which indicates frequencies, intensities, volume changes, melody, and harmony all at once and with the most exact control of time.

Music is mathematical:
It is rhythmically based on the subdivisions of time into fractions which must be done instantaneously, not worked out on paper.

Music is a foreign language:
Most of the terms are in Italian, German, or French; and the notation is certainly not English— but a highly developed kind of shorthand that uses symbols to represent ideas. The semantics of music is the most complete and universal language.

Music is history:
Music usually reflects the environments and times of its creation, often even the country and/or racial feeling.

Music is a physical education:
It requires fantastic coordinations of the fingers, hands, arms, lips, cheek, and facial muscles, in addition to extraordinary dinary control of the diaphragmatic, back, stomach, and chest muscles, which respond instantly to the sound the ear hears and the mind interprets.

Music is all these things, but most of all music is art:
It allows a human being to take all these dry technically boring (but difficult) techniques and use them to create emotion. That is one thing that science cannot duplicate: humanism, feeling, emotion, call it what you will.

This is why we teach music!
Not because we expect you to major in music.
Not because we expect you to play or sing all your life.
Not so you can relax.
Not so you can have fun.
BUT— so you will be human.
So you will recognize beauty.
So you will be sensitive.
So you will be closer to an infinite beyond this world.
So you will have something to cling to.
So you will have more love, more compassion, more gentleness, more good— in short, more life.

Of what value will it be to make a prosperous living unless we know how to live?

That is why we teach music.

Pennsylvania Music Educators’ Association  (via vivaciousviolinist)
(this post was reblogged from flipyeahbandbuffalo)

ohscience:

bbsrc:

Parasitic bacterium turns plants into zombies

BBSRC-funded scientists have discovered how a bacterial parasite turns plants into the living dead.

The bacteria called phytoplasma is able to manipulate the way plants grow, causing infected plants to transform their flowers into leaf tissue.  In doing so, the plants are sacrificing their reproductive success and becoming sterile – dead to the future and destined to only benefit the survival of the bacteria parasite (healthy plant seen in the top image and an infected plant can be seen in the middle image).

For the first time scientists can reveal how this remarkable manipulation takes place. The parasitic bacterium produces a protein called SAP54 that tricks the plant into transforming its flowers into leaf-like material. This transformation makes the plant more attractive to leafhoppers for settlement - the bacterium’s next victim and host to be (see leafhopper in image three).

Once an enticed leafhopper eats the infected zombie plant, the bacteria then catches a ride in their saliva on to the next plant they hop on to – starting the cycle all over again.

This research comes from the labs of Professor Hogenhout at John Innes Centre, and Professors Angenent and Immink at Wageningen University.

Images: John Innes Centre

Read more at: http://bit.ly/RNWZn5

For more research on plant infection go to: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

(submitted by tanzellanator)

(this post was reblogged from ohscience)